Who was H. H. Holmes?

HH-HolmesWho was H. H. Holmes? Many things. A physician. A brother. A master manipulator. Chicago’s first serial killer. The source of my unending curiosity for the past few years.

H. H. Holmes was born in Gilmanton, New Jersey, in 1861. Made infamous through Erik Larson’s non-fiction The Devil in the White City, Holmes has now been the feature of several documentaries and bus tours in Chicago that will take you by his killing grounds–including the former location of his Murder Castle.

Sound ominous? It should. The more I learn about him, the more intrigued/baffled I become. (So much so that I wrote a novel, published some short stories, and started this website and blog!)

Jeff Mudgett, Holmes’ great-great grandson and author of Bloodstains, was the driving force behind the History Channel’s American Ripper docuseries. One goal of the show was to determine if Holmes could have been London’s Jack the Ripper (there is documentation that he was in London at the time of the murders), and another was to determine if Holmes was actually the body in his grave. His really weird double-grave, encased in concrete. No, I’m not making this up.

In the end, the History Channel’s experts determined that the body in Holmes grave was a “conclusive link” to the real Holmes.

Jeff Mudgett disagrees, and I can’t say I blame him.

On a recent Facebook post, he outlines his reasons–based upon admissions of court-appointed anthropologists from the University of Pennsylvania:

  1. The physical injuries that should occur upon hanging, like a broken hyoid bone, were not there.
  2. The DNA did not match.
  3. The skeleton size itself did not fit the descriptions of Holmes.

Holmes was a mastermind when it came to life insurance scams, stealing bodies, killing people, forging dental records, etc. Let’s not forget he was a doctor who was intimately aware of the human body, as he often stole bodies and killed people to make articulated skeletons that he could then sell to universities. Is it such a leap to think he could have managed to fake his death?

If you too are morbidly interested in this man, check out the rest of my website and short stories. And  sign up for my email list. I have the H. H. Holmes Handbook coming out soon, and my subscribers will not only get a first look but get it for free!

 

 

H. H. Holmes Hits the Headlines

Holmes

Imagine my surprise when I saw a link pop up in my Facebook feed with this headline: River North hotel invites guests to spend a killer night in H.H. Holmes pop-up suite

Yep. You read that correctly.

If you’ve followed by blog for any length of time, you know that my novel is based on the murders of H.H. Holmes. He’s received some cult-level popularity via Erik Larsen’s book, The Devil in the White City, the recent History channel American Ripper docuseries, and even American Horror Story. And now, for a limited time, the Acme Hotel Company in River North is converting a hotel suite into a Holmes-lover’s dream. Or is that nightmare?

Decor included in your scare stay: old newspaper clippings, surgical tools, and Holmes’ mug staring at you. All. Night. Long.

Acme Hotel, this Holmes fanatic thinks you’ve landed on a spectacular idea.

Attached in the same Tribune article? A link to an interactive “walking tour” of the 1893 World’s Fair. Incredibly cool, and not just for a writer’s research either! 

NaNoWriMo approaches…

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It’s October, and you know what that means! Pumpkin spice everything–and NaNoWriMo: National Novel Writing Month.

Never heard of it? Read Kristen Kieffer’s excellent distillation on her blog, well-storied. In a nutshell, it’s a bazillion people trying to write 50,000 words in one month. That’s 1,667 words a day. A DAY. Crazy? Perhaps. But NaNoWriMo has forums and pep talks and regional groups that all help create a beautiful (and maybe a little crazy) writing community to help you along.

I wrote a bit about my last NaNoWriMo experience here, and I’m so looking forward to beginning again in a few weeks–especially because I’m starting a group for my students. Creative writing is not something that Common Core values, so I squeeze that in wherever and whenever I can! I will be writing feverishly alongside them as well.

Many NaNo writers spend their Octobers preparing (i.e. Preptober) for the challenge. Given my experience, I would strongly encourage you to do the same–and Rachael Stephen, author of State of Flux and creator of the plot embryo, has a ton of practical resources for free on her website. (She is also a bullet journaler–check out her video of her NaNoWriMo one. Talk about a work of art!) She also offers a free (FREE) seven-day course on plotting–all on one page. For those of us who tend to eschew outlines and too much preparation, it is a perfect solution to meet in the middle.

Are you up for the challenge? Let me know if you are! I’d love to keep in touch with other NaNo-ers!

Sign up HERE to get my blog posts delivered to your mailbox. You can always read them here, but email subscribers will receive extras along the way! Sign up today and receive a snippet of my current project: The Devil Inside Me.

 

Back on the Wagon

As most teachers will tell you, August tends to be our version of the new year. Everything starts fresh again: new students, new notebooks, new pens that I don’t need…The summer tends to be a recharging time for me, and while I really thought I’d knock out all of my edits for The Devil Inside Me, I did not. Not even close. But with the beginning of the “new” year, I have reset the clock and calendar, and the edits are calling. It’s interesting how, when you let your work sit for awhile, it often comes calling for you. In my case, it’s getting back into a regular schedule of things, which means regularly scheduled writing time. I’m changing up my schedule though: When actively writing, I try to write as close to daily as possible. However, I’ve discovered that this revision process requires more of my time in one sitting–so rather than block an hour out daily, I’m finding ways to chunk my time a few days a week, such as moving weekly chores onto one night so I have three straight hours to work the next. Knowing that I have a block of time, well, I can’t even tell you how much I looked forward to my dates with my manuscript this week!

The Devil Inside Me–snippet #3

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When I asked a few weeks back what YOU would like to see on this blog, some kind souls requested more from my work-in-progress, The Devil Inside Me. Allow me to introduce you to one of my favorite suspects, Elyse Baxter. Enjoy!


    “And your name?” Davis, lost in thought, had barely looked up when the next person walked up to him.

    “Elyse Baxter.”

    He looked more closely once the silky voice hit his ears and saw a young woman with long, dark chestnut hair and fair skin, devoid of make-up, sitting down across from him. In Davis’ mind, she didn’t need the make-up. She didn’t need much of anything.

    “And Ms. Baxter, what is it you do at the museum?”

    “I’m a preparator. I’m the preparator for the Holmes’ exhibit.” Davis raised his head again when Ms. Baxter emphasized her “the.”

    “What does that entail?”

    “I handle and prepare all manner of artifacts for our exhibits. I coordinate with others to ensure proper and timely installation of our exhibits. And I was the lead preparator and project manager for this exhibit.”

    “So you’re responsible for this display?”

    “This exhibit,” she corrected. “Yes.”

    “Uh huh.” Davis made a few scratches on his notepad. The preparator smoothed her knee-length skirt and uncrossed, then re-crossed, her legs.

    “How long have you been working here?”

    “I’ve been with the museum for three years now. Prior to that I worked at the Boston Museum of Science.”

    “Are you from Boston?”

    “Not too far from it.”

    Davis looked up from his notes, waiting for her to explain. She didn’t.

    “Where?”

    “Pennsylvania.”

    Again, Davis paused, scratching at his two day scruff, allowing for further detail. She said nothing.

    “Can you be more specific?”

    Elyse Baxter sighed. “Philadelphia.”

    “So you’re responsible for this display–how so? Start to finish?”

    “While it is unusual, yes–I was responsible for the design and implementation for this–exhibit–from start to finish. I presented my concept drawing to Mr. Panetti two years ago, before the television hype and the movie deal. He sat on it for a year until he realized there was more than just a cult following.”

    “There’s a movie deal?”

    “Yes. Leonardo DiCaprio will be playing H. H. Holmes?” she asked with the same incredulity of Chapman.

    Davis continued scratching down notes.

    “So then what? He agreed?”

    “Yes. I had two other designers who worked with me to build the concept model, and–” She waved her hand with a flourish. “This is the result.”

    “And when did you last see the disp–exhibit?”

    “About thirty minutes ago, when the docent explained what was going on.”

    “Where were you prior to that?”

    “I was working in our creative space–it’s on the lower level, where my office is.”

    “And prior to that, when was the last time you saw the exhibit?”

    “This morning, at 6am. I was giving everything one more look.”

    “One more look?”

    “Today was the opening day for this exhibit. Surely you heard it advertised, Detective. It’s on the side of eight CTA buses. This is a central piece to our museum, to Chicago.”

    He nodded. She continued.

    “It’s also our first PG-13 rated exhibit. That generated even more of an interest from the public.”

    “So you were giving everything a once-over before it opened up?”

    “Yes. I was responsible for its execution, so I had to ensure everything was perfect.”

    Interesting choice of words, thought Davis.

    “I don’t mean to be cold and unfeeling, Detective, but do you have any idea how long this…scene…will keep my exhibit closed? So many people were looking forward to it.”

Real Life Interferes

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It’s that time again: back-to-school. As a teacher, this middle part of August is a blur of putting a classroom back together, managing all of the new training modules the school/district/state dictates, and making deals with the copy machine that if it will just not jam for the next hundred copies, you’ll be finished. For the day.

Yes, I know. I get ten weeks off in the summer to do whatever I please. I’m (fortunately and gratefully) past the salary range where I no longer have to work a summer job or two to make ends meet. And trust me, I appreciate the time to recharge, relax, and tackle big projects. This year, one big project was gallbladder removal. Ugh.

But every August–and at other points throughout the year–real life rears its head and presents some challenges that simply prevent me from getting everything done that needs to be: sometimes it’s cleaning the house, sometimes it’s yard work, and sometimes, like now, it’s editing The Devil Inside Me.

What I’ve learned over the last two years of writing is that it’s ok. It’s ok if occasionally the project goes on the backburner. I used to feel horribly guilty if I wasn’t “touching” the novel in one way or another, but these breaks can also help reinvigorate the creative brain. So when life gets in the way, let’s cut ourselves some slack. What matters most is getting back at it!

Sign up for my mailing list HERE to receive a snippet of my current project: The Devil Inside Me. I’d love to hear your comments!

I signed up for a writing conference…part deux

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I blogged about the Indiana Writing Workshop conference and how excited/nervous I was to attend, but the weather in Illinois and Indiana created enough ice to prevent me from going. However, the folks who put together these workshops do them all over the states–so I signed up for the June version in Chicago. (Bonus: I can take the train. Second bonus: There had better not be an ice storm in June.) It will be coming up soon–June 23–and I believe spots are still available! It’s held at the grand old Congress Plaza hotel (which is in my book, The Devil Inside Me), overlooking Buckingham Fountain and Lake Michigan. The price is very reasonable, so if you’re nearby, come join us!

I’ve repeated the text of my original post below to encourage us all to take these risks for our writing. Just like you’ll never know if someone will publish your work until you submit it (repeatedly), you’ll never know what you can learn and what connections you can make until you attend a conference/workshop.


When I participated in Writer’s Digest’s First Ten Pages Boot Camp, one of the features was a lengthy, very open Q&A with our critiquing agent. One question posed in my group was this: What, aside from a polished manuscript and a stand-out query letter, can writers do to get published?

Paula Munier of Talcott Notch Literary Services suggested writing conferences. Why wouldn’t you want to meet like-minded people, network with agents and editors, attend mini-classes on everything from finding an agent to reworking point-of-view?

I began researching (while the introvert inside of me shrieked, “Strangers! Small talk!”) and discovered the Indiana Writing Workshop–not terribly far from me, with a reasonable cost and a featured agent on my dream-agent list.

In the one day conference, there are opportunities to pitch multiple agents. You can also have Chuck Sambuchino critique your query letter. (I will share the results, no matter how embarrassing.) Classes cover publishing options, finding an agent, a first chapter critique-fest, revising, and marketing.

All of these pieces fit my needs perfectly, so I signed up last month. And now that it’s getting closer, I’m starting to question what the heck I was thinking!

Lucky for me, just like with Lauren Sapala’s serendipitous post last week that fanned the writing flame inside me, a little bit of kismet came my way when I saw this older post from The Muse Crew. (Thank you to D. A. Henneman for sharing the blog link!) Four of the blog’s contributors attended the same conference and reported back for their readers. Here is a sampling of their advice:

“Pitch to an agent in your genre. Research your genre to find out what is currently being sought after, then consider how your story matches. Think of it like a job interview – find out what they want, then share what you have to offer and how you can meet their needs.”

“You have less than 15 minutes to shine, so put your best foot forward.”

“Consider what other popular authors in your genre have a similar writing style to your own. Often agents will ask you about your favorite author or if your writing is similar to any well-known author. Agents also like to know if you have published anything else, if you are working on anything else and whether your story is more plot driven or character driven. Be prepared to answer these questions.”

“I highly recommend doing this! It forces you to practice describing your work in a concise way, it gives you an idea if your story ideas are interesting to those who market them…”

While I’m still a little nervous, The Muse Crew’s advice reminded me why I’m doing this. If I want people to read this story, then I have to–gulp–let people read this story.

What kind of experiences have you had at writing conferences? I’d love to hear about them–the good, the bad, and the horrific!

 

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