Good Book Alert!

9781509812271rattle_13_jpg_264_400

Good book alert! I recently finished Fiona Cummins’ book Rattle (The Bone Collector #1). I have been relatively lost in the world of H.H. Holmes, reading everything I can that’s within a certain time-frame to his life. I go to sleep dreaming about The Gangs of New York and wake up thinking about Alex Grecian’s The Yard. During the day, my mind wonders how Caleb Carr’s brain works. (Side note: If you haven’t read or watched The Alienist, what are you waiting for??)

I needed a break. Not from crime and mystery and the horrors of humanity, mind you, but from the 19th century. Enter Rattle. Set in modern-day England, it traces the story of missing children from various viewpoints–including the kidnapper, who is much more than a kidnapper. I didn’t read it in one sitting because I’m a teacher and need to be with-it during the day, but I did get it read in two nights. If you’re fascinated by the psychology behind why we do what we do, clear your schedule and pick up Rattle.

Here are two reviews that give a few more details…one from The Suspense is Thrilling Me (I gave them some props in February), and one from The Book Review Cafe.

What Makes a Serial Killer?

pexels-photo-970517.jpeg

On April 4th, Fourth and Sycamore published my short story, “Downright Devilish,” which is the first in a series of shorts to re-imagine the childhood of Dr. H. H. Holmes, Chicago’s (allegedly) first serial killer. Holmes, whose real name was Herman Webster Mudgett, grew up in Gilmanton, New Hampshire, in the 1800s. (You can read more about him on this blog post.)

When I began learning about Holmes, what fascinated me the most was the eternal question of what makes a serial killer? Is it nature or nurture? Was his overbearing father enough to turn him into a quiet killer, or was he simply born without compassion and conscience? I found plenty of ideas in my research notes and the death records for Gilmanton which led to this short story series. After you read “Downright Devilish,” read “Diabolical” here!

Sign up HERE to get my blog posts delivered to your mailbox. You can always read them here, but email subscribers will receive extras along the way! Sign up today and receive a snippet of my current project: The Devil Inside Me.

Just Submit the Story Already!

pexels-photo-862115.jpegOn Twitter, I began participating in the #52stories52weeks challenge, which is just as it sounds: write a short story/flash fiction piece every week for a year. Now, let’s be honest– I stopped working on short stories to focus on finishing my WIP, The Devil Inside Me, but that challenge helped me in so many ways. In addition to connecting with fellow writers, I also explored my WIP’s characters through these short pieces. Each one had a background story to tell, from the protagonist to the murder victims to the H.H. Holmes tour guide.

The legend of H.H. Holmes, as you may know, is what prompted me to begin The Devil Inside Me. One of my short stories, “Downright Devilish,” is part of a series that re-imagines the childhood of Holmes, based partly on historical fact. I was hesitant to submit it anywhere because, well, I’m not a published author. But everyone has to start somewhere in order to become that published author, right? So I submitted. And submitted. And submitted. And got rejection. And rejection. And rejection. And…a yes!

Please enjoy “Downright Devilish” as it appears on Fourth and Sycamore’s online literary journal.

Writers, if you have a short story lying around, or some poetry tucked away in a notebook, submit it. That one “yes” will be worth the stack of rejections, I promise.

PS–If you want to read more of The Devil Inside Me, sign up HERE today!

Local Author Fairs

books-bookstore-book-reading-159711.jpegAre you a book lover? Are you obsessed with certain authors? Do you wish you could meet them, have them sign your copy of their book, ask them questions? Then check out some of your local author book fairs! It’s a perfect way to do all of the above AND support the arts in your local community. (Aspiring writers, you should go too! Keep reading!)

While I live in the sticks, I am also within an hour of three large (populations over 100,000) cities. There are a plethora of events among them, typically located at public libraries, community colleges, universities, and bookstores. These provide an excellent way to connect with and support your local writers!

Last November, one public library hosted a drop-in fair to celebrate NaNoWriMo. Six local authors were on hand to sell and sign copies of their books. There was a variety of genres from thriller to children’s, and attendees were also treated to complimentary snacks and drinks.

On the same day, another city’s public library hosted a similar event, this time to help a children’s literacy fund. Authors generously donated a proceed of their sales, and the library advertised it as a way to get some holiday shopping done–simultaneously stimulating the local economy, local authors’ pocketbooks, and funds for the non-profit.

Every local author event I’ve gone to has been free for attendees–and often there are free goodies to be had–from refreshments to bookmarks and other book-swag the authors have available. How cool is it to be able to discover local authors, to talk to them about their work, to discuss their processes not only in writing but publishing? Readers, you might find your next favorite, and never underestimate the importance of readers to writers. Without you, who would read our work? For aspiring authors, this is more than just a networking opportunity. Most people are more than happy to share what their path has been like and may be able to offer you hints and advice for your own journey. For example, I took a community education course taught by Joe Chianakas, author of the Rabbit in Red trilogy. He was instrumental in helping me believe that I, too, could travel down the writing and publication path. Thanks, Joe!

Not sure where to find them? Try bookmarking the local college’s website, and start following social media sites for your public library. Google searches may help you find locations you didn’t even know about. That’s how I discovered one of my now-favorite bookstores, Lit Books, and a super-cool Madison book fair called Madtown Author Daze. You’ll forge friendships with booksellers and authors alike.

On April 7th, my local Barnes and Noble will have several local authors representing everything from young adult to paranormal, including Joe Chianakas, Sylvia Shults, J.E. Mueller, Sydney Raine, Alana Hitchell, Ron Swan, and Dylan Nelson. UPDATE: I just found out there will be TWO DAYS of local-author-goodness happening! The following will be at Barnes and Noble on Sunday, April 8th: Jason HendersonNancy FrantzDemetria WilliamsAnne PetersonJessica PetersonBridget NelanCarrie Lowrance, and Ahaveh Maure.

Readers, have you attended a local author fair? What was the best part? How far would you travel to see your favorite author? What/who would you like to see at one?

Sign up HERE to get my blog posts delivered to your mailbox. You can always read them here, but email subscribers will receive extras along the way! Sign up today and receive a snippet of my current project: The Devil Inside Me.

Finding the Time to Write (and Read)

pexels-photo-707676.jpeg

Finding time to write and read can be challenging if you have a full-time job or children to tend to–or both. I teach high school English, and the demands of planning and grading for a writing-focused curriculum (for three grade levels) often cuts into my personal time. This is a way of life for many teachers; it’s just part of the job.

When I decided to be serious about putting The Devil Inside Me out there, I knew I couldn’t just write when the muse showed up. I would need to carve time out of my schedule. I’m a believer of the mantra “we make time for what’s important to us,” and this writing endeavor was important to me.

So, I crafted a schedule of goals for the year. That schedule included research, development of a website, and this blog. Each of those in turn added more to the schedule: trips to Chicago to capture the essence of a building or a nasty winter day, learning how to use WordPress and plug-ins, educating myself on creating a blog that could be meaningful to others. I wasn’t dedicating my “writing time” solely to writing; rather, I was dedicating my writing time to learning about the craft and how to get my work out there. Part of that included setting aside time each week for reading.

We all have challenges that take up writing/reading time. I live in the country. That translates to a 20 minute trip to get just about anywhere; to go to the nearest “city” means 30-40 minutes. (And I don’t mean Chicago–that’s 2-3 hours!) When a fellow writer serendipitously posted on social media that dictation made her commute productive, a light bulb went off. Why hadn’t I thought of that, especially when I listen to audiobooks on long trips? 

My next 30 minute trip into “the city” produced 1400 words. Second trip? 1200.  Third? 1300. I started simply–I’m only using Google Docs and my cell phone’s microphone. Now, this means you’ll end up with text that reads as follows: “ I always had these go floating around in my head goes spooky.” But it’s worth it to attempt to translate myself for the sake of having WORDS ON THE PAGE. Another plus: My inner editor is hogtied because I can’t look at my phone–all I can do is talk. This results in higher word counts in less time.

If you find yourself in your car frequently, perhaps this can work for you too! There are other tools that do a better job than my set-up. Joe Warnimont’s post on The Write Life lists several, including the well-known Dragon Dictation.

Writers, do you currently use voice-to-text to help with your writing? If so, share your tips and tricks in the comments!

Readers, do you love audiobooks, or do you need that paper in your hand?

Sign up HERE to get your hands on a snippet of The Devil Inside Me. Subscribers receive additional extras along the way!  

Finding Good Books

pexels-photo-373465.jpeg

I’ve been posting about writing, writing, and writing. So this one is for the readers!

One thing I have discovered on my writing journey is just how many published authors are out there–authors who, though they may not be bestsellers or end-cap sellers at your local bookstore, are quality writers with killer stories to tell.

If you’ve been reading my blog, you know I’m a fan of mysteries and thrillers and crime novels. I like a little historical fiction too (hellooooo The Alienist), and if all of the above are combined, I’m in heaven. But the path to good books is not always obvious, and I prefer recommendations.

Enter Chelsea and her blog: The Suspense Is Thrilling Me. She and two guest reviewers post at minimum a couple times a week, and their reviews are straightforward and honest. Her review of Alafair Burke’s The Wife caught my attention (and, after reading it, I am in total agreement of the excitement she exudes in her post), and I’ve been a follower ever since. If you’re looking for excellent suggestions on what to read next, hop on over to The Suspense Is Thrilling Me!