Joining a Writing Group


groupLast month in my Top Five Things This Writer Is Thankful For post, I mentioned two writers’ groups: the Mystery Writers of America and Sisters in Crime. When I first began thinking seriously about this writing thing, I did some research. Ok, I did a LOT of research.

Much of the advice centered around finding others like you in various stages of the process: beginners with only a story running through their heads; people who had novels written but not yet published; those from both sides of the traditional publishing/self-publishing aisle–both brand new and seasoned professionals.

Great, I thought. I live in the middle of nowhere. How was I going to find these people? Twitter has a beyond-fabulous writing community that stretches all dimensions of personality and experience, but I wanted to find people I could connect with in real life too. I learned about the genre-specific groups, most of which have a national–even international–presence. However, that presence does not reach its tendrils to the middle of nowhere. The closest I was going to get was Chicago. Enter Mystery Writers of America-Midwest (MWA) and Sisters i(and Misters!) n Crime-Chicagoland (SinC). I signed up, considering the membership charges an investment in my goals.

A year ago, I was hesitant to attend any of their events. I didn’t even have a completed manuscript. I didn’t know Imposter’s Syndrome was a thing, but I was certainly in the throes of it. (An excellent guest post by Kassandra Lamb on Jami Gold’s blog can help you self-diagnose. *smile*) I finally attended the Chicago Writing Workshop. Several people–including a published author and a small press publisher–encouraged me to join MWA and SinC, explaining that they were helpful for people at any stage of the game.

They were so right.

I’ve since attended four events (two events for each group). All were free, I might add, provided you’re a member, but I can’t even put a price on the value. I’ve found a group of people who are at the same stage, and we stay connected via email. I’ve found two beta readers. I’ve learned about others’ struggles and successes, small presses, the worth of an agent, and the changing landscape of publishing. I’ve networked with published authors and publishers themselves. And I’ve found an incredibly supportive group of people–no matter their “station” in the writing world–who are encouraging and willing to help others along their journeys.

If you are suffering from Imposter’s Syndrome and are doubting your worth, your credibility, your ability, I hope that you seek out some writing groups, whether it’s a general group or genre-specific, whether it’s home-grown that meets at your local library or internationally-known. Don’t be afraid to step out of that comfort zone so many of us writers dwell in! You will likely be pleasantly surprised.

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